Tag Archives: CSP-Corcoran SHU

Return to Corcoran-SHU from CCI-Tehachapi for “step 3”

This is reblogged from: Prisoner Human Rights Movement

Posted on 25 May 2015

A report from Jabari about his return to CSP-Corcoran for “step 3″ of the “Step-Down Program”:
April 19, 2015

They finally officially opened up the step 3 program here at CSP-Corcoran, and they needed volunteers from CCI-Tehachapi for this, so I volunteered. Anything to get away from that hell-hole in the mountains.

This is what I have gotten from my 32 days back at Corcoran
First and foremost it is true that they have this 8 to 10 correctional officers’(c/o s’) ‘welcoming party’ that welcomes each bus or van of transfers at the front gate when you first step off the bus. You are welcomed with this bully attack upon you that is strategically and tactically launched to provoke a physical response from each individual who steps off the bus.
With us, we arrived in a convoy of three vans. In the first van were two young Southern Mexicans, in the second van were me and an older Afrikan Brotha, and in the last van was a Caucasian (a close friend of mine). Thus we were able to witness this bully attack and prepare ourselves for it before we were made subjects to it.

Welcoming squad
There were about 8 c/o’s hovering around the exit door of the van with a lieutenant carrying a handheld cam-recorder, an overseeing sergeant and a questions sergeant, who threw a barrage of questions at you like a drill sergeant in the army, to confuse and throw your thinking off, so that you cannot form a clear thought to launch an effective physical attack back and/or take your mind completely away from the fact that they removed the block lock off your handcuff, removed your handcuff, removed your waste chains and your ankle chains, and then handcuff your hands behind you.

They do all this in one quick well-rehearsed motion, in which one c/o acts as though he is peacefully assisting you off the vehicle, but as soon as he has a nice firm grip on your arm, he snatches you off of the vehicle into the crowd of bully attackers, where the one in front of you grabs a fistful of clothing in your chest-area with one hand, then with the other hand he has a firm grip on your other arm. Then another grabs a fist full of part of your clothing, while behind you, you have a guy with a hand full of part of your clothing, another firm grip of your arm, and at the same time he is kicking your foot far apart from your other foot. On the other side of you, behind you, there is another guy doing the same thing: kicking your other foot out. They are directly behind you and a guy has a firm grip on your forehead, with his fist he is pushing into the back of your neck and the hand that is gripping your forehead is also pulling your head backwards and he is yelling at you saying “Look up at the sky! Look up at the sky!” while the sergeant is yelling a barrage of questions and demands at you. “Look-up-at-the-sky!”

It’s all crazy and you truly have to be a very well disciplined person to get through this well-organized attack without attacking back. With us, we all understand and realize that we can not mistake aggressive action for effective action to get our point across, which requires a strong life commitment and discipline.

Moving forward, after successfully making it past Corcoran’s bully squad, we were given one of everything as far as laundry and lining are concerned. But upon our second Thursday here we were given 3 boxers for underwear, 3 t-shirts, 3 pairs of socks, new tennis [shoes] and sheets, pillows,
pillowcases. The 5 men who came with me, we all got our property on the 23rd day after our arrival, and for me, all the property that CCI-Tehachapi seized from me when I got there was still being stored there, thus it came back to CSP-Corcoran with me. Corcoran gave me back everything except for my radio and tv, but I did get the radio that was purchased for me in Tehachapi by a friend. So everything CCI-Tehachapi took from me, Corcoran gave back (except for the radio&tv), and some of my pictures which put me over the 40 allowed.

Yard
Yard is run three times a week for 1-Left (1L) and three times a week for 1-Right (1R) on off-setting days: week 1 1-Left get yard on Monday-Wednesday-Fridays, and the top tier has first yard from 8:30AM to 11:30 AM, and the way the c/o’s do it to maximize time is tha the two officers who escort the first yard cage in, will go and get the first cell on the bottom tier and bring them out to the yard cage from where they just took the first prisoners out of. Thus it maximizes the time and gets the next yard out quicker, who stay out until 3:30 PM.

Unit 1-Right has on week 1 Tuesday-Thursday-Saturdays, again with the top tier from 8:30 AM to 11:30 AM, and the bottom tier 12:30 to 3:30 PM. Then it rotates for the second week, in which 1-Left will have Tuesday-Thursday-Saturdays, and 1-Right will have Mon-Wed-Fridays.

All Sundays are for “make up yard”: if there is fog, or yard is closed or stopped for some reason, or you have a group meeting, you will get make up yard on Sunday, in which you might go out with 1-Right and 1-Left. [note: typist heard that this make up yard has recently been denied to people in 1L without any reason given].

Breakfast is passed out at 7 AM every morning and it is picked up at 7:30AM. They have trays with lids now, but they are bigger than at CCI-Tehachapi. Thus people are counted every morning in time for yard to start at 8:30 on time and sometimes earlier.

Visiting
Saturdays visiting starts at 8:30 AM for 4B yard and ends at 11:30-12:30. 4A yard starts at 11:30 and ends at 3:30 PM.
On Sundays 4A starts at 8:30 AM and ends at 12:30 PM, and 4B starts at 11:30 AM and ends at 3:30 PM.

Prisoners can have a visit on both Saturday and Sunday but your visitor cannot the same person: for instance, your sister can’t visit on both Saturday and Sunday, but your sister can visit on Saturday and your brother on Sunday. And your visit can last from anywhere between 1 to 2 hours, depending on how many people are visiting, if space is needed or not needed. So you see some guys out there for 1:15, 1:30, 1:45 up to 2:00. And when making an appointment for that coming week, you can also reserve a spot for the following weekend, and it doesn’t take an hour or longer to make an appointment.

Laundry
Laundry is the old laundry-bag system by putting dirty laundry in laundry bags, sending them out to be washed and returned to you. When ordering laundry they will accommodate you with sizes up to 6XL boxers, 6XL t-shirts. The size you fit.

Canteen
Food is about the same except they give you fresh oranges here every day – different from the apples in CCI-Tehachapi. Fresh real fruit juices, real maple syrup and canned fruit. Real jelly.
The canteen has a couple of extra items such as digital antennas, cable connectors, and L-connectors for flatscreen tv’s, chillibeans in pouch, spicy vegetable soup, bowls and cups with lids, Irish Spring soap (60 ct), and Dial soap (85ct).

TV Stations
These range from 39 stations up to 90 station, depending on building section and cell. In the section and building we are in, guys are getting 39 to 70 stations: all the PBS stations, all local stations, Spanish stations, movie stations, etc. etc. You get a lot of tv stations here that you have to get out of the air with digital antennas or loose wire. Radio stations are the same, you get many radio stations.

Showers
They are not walking to showers yet, but they say they are going to start letting us walk alone this coming week and then soon after they will extend available jobs. Up to now I am the only Afrikan in this section [but this has changed at the time of typing this, 5/9].

Jabari Scott, H30536
CSP-Cor-SHU 4B-1R-64
P.O. Box 3481
Corcoran, CA 93212

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Hunger Strike for Medical Care at CSP-Corcoran SHU!

UPDATE:
After a week of hunger striking by three men inside Corcoran SHU and organizers calling and writing to the prison, we are happy to report that Kambui Robinson has been moved to the Acute Care Hospital in Corcoran for his diabetic complications, and the hunger strike is now ended.

Thanks to everyone who called, wrote, or circulated the message—but our fight is not over!

Advocacy is still needed for the following issues:

Kambui Robinson’s health is in a dire state and he needs to be permanently moved into a medical care facility such as the one in Vacaville. Diabetic complications have left his eyesight so bad that he has not been able to read for several weeks, and he is has been experiencing stroke-like symptoms for
the past several weeks.

Michael Durrough is still without an extension cord for his CPAP machine, which is necessary for his sleep apnea. Without this cord, which is allowable property but currently withheld on warden’s discretion, Michael risks the possibility of stopping breathing while sleeping every night.

Heshima Denham needs immediate attention to severe pain he is experiencing on his right side. He is in constant pain and it has become extremely disruptive to daily activity. He needs an MRI as well as kidney and liver tests in order to diagnosis this pain.

We need adequate medical care for everyone in CSP-Corcoran!  At this time, please continue to contact the below officials alerting them to the immediate needs of Kambui Robinson (C-82830), Michael Dorrough (D-83611) and Heshima Denham (J-38283).

Calls to the Receiver’s office are especially welcome.  (The receiver’s office will call you back and will tell you that they can’t give out peoples’ personal medical info, but all you need to do is reply that you’re not asking for such info and are just asking that the individuals you have called about receive appropriate and timely care).

Please call the Medical Receiver Kelso’s office via the “inmate hotline”, (916) 691-1404
Thank you!!
Oct 9th 2014
—————–
On Friday 26th of 2014, three men locked inside unit 4B-1L  of the Secure Housing Unit (SHU) of CSP-Corcoran started a hunger strike: Heshima Denham (cdcr reg.nr J-38283), followed on 9/27 by Michael Zaharibu Dorrough (cdcr reg. nr D-83611) and Kambui Robinson (cdcr reg. nr C-82830) will join them in the following day for a few days as long as he can with his condition.

This was mentioned verbally to a visitor on 27th of September. Since we have no way of connecting fast to any of them (there is NO TELEPHONE IN THE SHU!) we have to wait until we hear from them again on any updates.

Why?
The medical care at CSP-Corcoran SHU is so bad, that life-threatening situations have occurred on too many occasions to the people in the SHU and possibly also elsewhere at CSP-Corcoran, that they have had to resort to the ultimate nonviolent means of a hunger strike in order to make this point known to the warden, the medical receiver and the administration of CDCr.

Several factors made the three decide to protest the lack of healthcare now: Kambui has diabetes that is very badly regulated with a HBA1C of 9.3 (far too high for diabetics, especially with those already suffering loss of eyesight and neuropathy), and Zaharibu has dangerous, untreated extremely high cholesterol being a patient with high chances of developing stroke, who also has untreated gall stones and a CPAP -machine without an extension-cord to work effectively. Custody staff interfering with medical staff is causing dangerous situations.

What can you do to help?
Ideally we want Zaharibu Dorrough, Kambui Robinson and all other chronic patients moved to Vacaville or New Folsom medical facilities, or at least:

For Kambui Robinson (C-82830):
– More self -control over insulin -dependent diabetes (better regulation, prevention of more complications,
– A special diet for people with diabetes, containing enough carbohydrate, low-fat, whole grains, access to glucose, daily exercise outside of cell. There is supposedly a diet available but Kambui is not receiving it;
– Kambui was rushed to hospital many times, he was given the wrong insulin on several occasions, etc., and Heshima, who has been in the vicinity of Kambui for more than 10 years now, has called ‘man down’ on many occasions due to lack of glucose or emergency food, lack of access to a blood level test, etc. It is only due to Kambui’s own careful self-care that he has survived until today. But he is going blind and suffering neuropathy in his limbs badly.
– Kambui also needs an MRI-scan to determine nerve damage in his brain.

See also for how diabetes is supposed to be managed in the federal system: http://www.bop.gov/resources/pdfs/diabetes.pdf

For Michael Zaharibu Dorrough (D-83611):
Normal access to the cpap-machine (i.e. an extension cord which all prisoners are allowed), treatment for high cholesterol levels and treatment for gallstones.

For Heshima Denham (J-38283):
We need an MRI-scan to make a diagnosis of the pain in his side that he has been feeling since 2011, and treatment for whatever it is. On x-rays soft tissue can not be seen. Heshima was recently also diagnosed with PTSD, for which he needs to be treated in a less stressful situation. A doctor told Heshima that he had scheduled him for an MRI-scan twice but apparently there is a rule in place that says that MRI-scans can only take place when there is a visible wound ?!

All have been locked up inside the SHU for decades (Zaharibu for 25+ years, Kambui for at least 23 years, Heshima for at least 10 years.

Although we concentrate on these three people who are on a hungerstrike, they have expressed that it is for all people with a disease, chronic or not, at CSP – Corcoran.

Please be aware that staff may be of the opinion that people who are locked up should not receive medical care, or should pay for this. But prisoners already pay per medical visit, and they have no income or possibility to gain means to pay for medical while inside as people in the world outside have.

Please call the Medical Receiver Kelso’s office via the “inmate hotline”, (916) 691-1404,

California Correctional Health Care Services
Controlled Correspondence Unit
P.O. Box 588500
Elk Grove, CA 95758

By Email: CPHCSCCUWeb@cdcr.ca.gov

and / or:

Warden Dave Davey, at 559 992-8800 or dave.davey@cdcr.ca.gov, or write to him at P.O. Box 8800, Corcoran, CA 93212-8309 and also ask the warden politely to also forward the complaints to the Medical Director of CSP-Corcoran!

Thank you!!

Corcoran SHU prisoners join Pelican Bay hunger strike

Corcoran SHU prisoners join Pelican Bay hunger strike

June 30, 2011

from the NCTT Corcoran SHU

[Photo: Prison guard George Sherman carries a rifle in the control room of the Pelican Bay SHU whenever a guard enters one of the groups of 10 cells. Corcoran SHU prisoners say the SHU there is designed the same way. – Photo and caption: John Burgess, Santa Rosa Press Democrat]

Greetings to all who support freedom, justice and equality. We here of the NCTT SHU stand in solidarity with and in full support of the July 1 hunger strike and the five major action points and sub-points as laid out by the Pelican Bay Collective in the policy statements.

What many are unaware of is that Facility 4B here in Corcoran SHU is designated to house validated prisoners in indefinite SHU confinement and has an identical ultra-supermax isolation unit short corridor, modeled after Corridor D in Pelican Bay, complete with blacked out windows, a mirror tinted glass on the towers so no one but the gun tower can see into our cells and none of us can see out, flaps welded to the base of the doors and sandbags on the tiers to prevent “fishing,” a means of passing notes etc. between cells using lengths of string, and IGI, Institutional Gang Investigators, to transport us all to medical appointments. Also, we have no contact with any prisoners or staff outside of this section here in 4B/1C C Section, the “short corridor” of the Corcoran SHU.

All of the deprivations, save access to sunlight, outlined in the five-point hunger strike statement are mirrored and in some instances intensified here in the Corcoran SHU 4B/1C C Section isolation gang unit. Medical care here, in a facility allegedly designed to house chronic care and prisoners with psychological problems, is so woefully inadequate that it borders on intentional disdain for the health of prisoners, especially where diabetics and cancer are an issue. Access to the law library is denied for the most mundane reasons or, most often, no reason at all. Yet these things and more are outlined in the Pelican Bay State Prison SHU’s five core demands.

Corcoran State Prison

What is of note here and something that should concern all U.S. citizens, is the increasing use of behavioral control, i.e. torture units and human experimental techniques against prisoners, not only in California but across the nation. Indefinite confinement, sensory deprivation, withholding food, constant illumination and use of unsubstantiated lies from informants are the psychological billy clubs being used in these torture units. The purpose of this “treatment” is to stop prisoners from standing in opposition to inhumane prison conditions and prevent them from exercising their basic human rights.

Many lawsuits have been filed in opposition to these conditions, yet the courts have repeatedly re-interpreted and misinterpreted their own constitutional law to support the state’s continued use of these torture units. When approved means of protest and redress of rights are proven meaningless and are fully exhausted, then the pursuit of those ends through other means is necessary.

It is important for all to know the Pelican Bay Collective is not alone in this struggle and the broader the participation and support for this hunger strike and other such efforts, the greater the potential that our sacrifice now will mean a more humane world for us in the future.

Indefinite confinement, sensory deprivation, withholding food, constant illumination and use of unsubstantiated lies from informants are the psychological billy clubs being used in these torture units.

A cell in a Security Housing Unit (SHU) – Photo: California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

We urge all who read these words to support us in this effort with your participation. Please call your local news agencies, notify your friends on social networks, contact your legislators and tell your fellow faithful at church, mosque, temple or synagogue. Decades before Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo, Pelican Bay and Corcoran SHUs were described by Congressman Ralph Metcalfe as “the control unit treatment program [of which] long-term punishment [is] under the guise of what is, in fact, pseudo-scientific experimentation.”

It is important for all to know the Pelican Bay Collective is not alone in this struggle and the broader the participation and support for this hunger strike and other such efforts, the greater the potential that our sacrifice now will mean a more humane world for us in the future.

Our indefinite isolation here is both inhumane and illegal and the proponents of the prison industrial complex are hoping that their campaign to dehumanize us has succeeded to the degree that you don’t care and will allow the torture to continue in your name. It is our belief that they have woefully underestimated the decency, principles and humanity of the people. Join us in opposing this injustice without end. Thank you for your time and support.

Our indefinite isolation here is both inhumane and illegal and the proponents of the prison industrial complex are hoping that their campaign to dehumanize us has succeeded to the degree that you don’t care and will allow the torture to continue in your name.


In Solidarity,
NCTT Corcoran SHU, 4B-1C – C Section, Super-Max Isolation Unit

This statement was submitted by Haribu L.M. Soriano-Mugabi, K-15721, CSP Corcoran, 4B-1L-42L, P.O. Box 3481, Corcoran, CA 93212, who asks readers to distribute copies and submit it to more publications “so as to inform the general public of our fight to change the inhuman conditions we are subjected to for our political beliefs or because we were falsely identified as politically active in an organization.” The statement first appeared on California Prison Watch.